Week 12- How do I make fairminded digital footprints?

The purpose of this practiceis to decide how to make fairminded digital footprints


Guiding Principle

If you actively practice being an aspiring critical thinker you will begin to make fairminded digital footprints.

Mindset

Learners who actively practice being aspiring critical thinkers make fairminded digital footprints.

Goal

Determine how to make fairminded digital footprints.


Practice Order

I. Absorb Set

Course Website
Read/view weekly course content

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

II. Do Set

Learner Blogs
Complete course activities on your personal course blog.


Due by Saturday 11:59 pm

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

III. Connect Set

Google Classroom

  • Complete providing feedback
Due by Monday 11:59 pm

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

IV. Reflect Set

Google Classroom

Grades- Complete self- assessment

Due by Tuesday 11:59 pm

The Internet sees the good, the bad and the ugly. The keys to social media success are being honest about your identity, being thoughtful about your posts and understanding the long-term implications of your behavior online. 

We live in an ever-changing culture, and culture is changed precisely by the positive ideas we engage with and the ones we choose to share. 

A positive online reputation is the best way to promote yourself if you are proactive and do it right. Don’t assume that it will happen by default. 

Seth Godin



How do I create fairminded digital footprints?


The meaning of sadhana.

Sadhana does not mean any specific kind of activity. Sadhana means you are using everything as a tool to open to the flow of natural experience.

Natural experience opens your connection to understanding and wisdom as it naturally comes and goes in the give and take of the river of life.

Sadhguru & T.Y. Pang

The meaning of true education.

True education should wake up the Innate Humanity inside of you. When you reach a higher level of practice and understanding, you learn to harmonize yourself inside, then you become able to harmonize with other people, and with outside situations.

T.Y. Pang

The Promise

It is up to you to make the time for practice; the more you practice the more you will learn.

Time is a created thing. To say I don’t have time,’ is like saying, I don’t want to.

― Lao Tzu

I. Absorb Set
Practice in order

Let’s Begin

First, please complete the sadhana practice. Second, click on each question and review each answer. Third, take a break!


1. Complete your sadhana practice.

Sadhana does not mean any specific kind of activity, sadhana means you are using everything as a tool to open to the flow of natural learning.

The purpose of this sadhana is to help you get started opening to the flow of natural experience .

Center yourself.

Click Here
This weeks centering thought

Close your eyes and quietly sit straight and upright head and spine straight, concentrating only on your breath for 2 minutes. Sit in an erect position, shoulders relaxed, palms flat on thighs. Center your focus on your midsection. Breath in and out deeply through your nose.

Quietly sit straight and upright head and spine straight, concentrating only on your breath. Sit in an erect position, shoulders relaxed, palms flat on thighs. Center your focus on your midsection. Breath in and out deeply through your nose.

Pay attention to your spine.

Your spine is where you will feel the flow of energy. Notice which parts of the spine feel warm and where there are no feelings or numbness. This information will indicate where your energy is flowing and where it is not. Your energy originates in the spine and flows out through the body.

straight and upright
When thoughts come up, let them go gently.

Don’t beat yourself up. That brings more thought. Gently let them go. Use the RAIN tool below to help you gently let go.


  • Recognize your thoughts.
  • Allow your thoughts to be just as they are.
  • Investigate your thoughts with kindness.
  • Natural awareness will come from not identifying with your thoughts.

Throughout the week, keep reminding yourself why you do sadhana.

Otherwise, your thoughts, your emotions, your physicality will get entangled with your runaway mind.

Practice tapping into your awareness to open your mind and take your thinking apart.
2. What are digital footprints?
3. What do your digital footprints reveal about you?
4. How do you establish a positive presence online?

Establishing a Positive Presence Online

Like it or not, if you use the Internet you have an online identity. Some people call this your “brand.” What’s a brand? Think about a brand of soft drink, or computer, or jeans, or a band or a sports team. You probably have a certain idea about each one – what it’s like, who buys it, and so on. Maybe you wear a branded t-shirt sometimes because you like what it says about you. That’s what your online brand is: it’s what people think of you based on what they see about you online.

Big companies spend millions of dollars making sure that you see their brand the way they want you to. You don’t have to put that much time or money into it, but there are a few pretty simple things you can do to make sure that the “you” people see online is how you want to be seen.

SEARCH YOURSELF 

A good place to start is to use a search engine to see what information about you is easily available. Try searching for your name – but don’t stop there, especially if it’s a fairly common one. Think about the search terms someone else might use if they were looking for information about you. Would they use a nickname? Your middle name or initials? A likely misspelling of your name? Maybe they add your hometown, or your school, or where you work or some of your hobbies. Type your name into the search bar and see what other search terms are suggested. Also, you can try putting “yourname”.com (or .ca) into the address bar and see if anyone else has registered that site. If not, it’s probably worth a few dollars each year to register it yourself, even if you’re not going to use it right away.

Do the same thing with any social networks you’re on. Someone may have created a spoof account with your name, or there may be someone with a similar name that people might confuse you with. Make sure to do an image search of your name, too!

IF YOU DON’T LIKE IT, ASK TO HAVE IT TAKEN DOWN

If you don’t like what you find, the first step is to try to get it taken down. It may be surprising, but just asking the person who posted it is pretty effective: according to one study, four out of five Internet users who’ve asked someone to take material down were successful. If that doesn’t work, you can find out which ISP hosts the site and ask them to take it down. ISPs will usually only do this if the material is defamatory (untrue and hurts your reputation), if it’s hate material or if what the site is doing could reasonably be called cyberbullying.

OUT WITH THE BAD, IN WITH THE GOOD

 If there are things about you online that you don’t like – or if searching for information about you leads to information about someone else who people might think is you – then you need to make sure that there’s enough positive material about you online to drown it out. Blogging, posting videos, commenting, leaving online reviews – anything that leaves a mark online is good so long as it sends the message you want. Don’t worry that everything you do has to make you look good; so long as it doesn’t make you look bad, it’s building your online presence and overriding any bad stuff that may be out there. 

If there’s another person online that people are mixing up with you, think about using a variation on your name. For instance, if there’s another John Smith who got caught selling fake Stanley Cup tickets, you may decide to go by Johnny Smith or John Q. Smith instead of trying to tell people you’re not him.

BUILD A BASE

An important step in building your brand is to have a home base online. This could be a website or a blog (but don’t use a social network profile as your home base – we’ll explain why below) – what matters is that it’s a place where you control your message and where everything you do online links back to. Why is that important? Because a lot of search engines count links when they’re doing a search, so the more you link back to your home base, the higher it will rank in any search for you. If you registered a website with your name, like we talked about in “Search Yourself” above, that’s the perfect place to make your home base.

You can have a “home base” picture, too: that’s a picture of yourself that you like (if you don’t want to use a real picture, there are lots of places online where you can create a cartoon version of yourself) that you use anytime you’re asked for a picture online – social networks, commenting systems and so on. Having a single picture that you use everywhere helps to build you identity online.

DON’T LET YOUR FRIENDS CONTROL YOUR BRAND

Why not use a social network profile as your home base? Because you don’t have full control over what happens there. Friends can post to your profile, comment on what you post, and link to things that you have no control over. You also can’t ever fully control your privacy on social networks because you’re counting on your friends, and their friends, to make good decisions.

That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t have any social network accounts: actually you should have an account on any social network a lot of your friends are using, even if you don’t do much with it, just to make sure that you have some control over your identity there. Just don’t link back to it from other places online.

THINK ABOUT WHO YOU ARE IN OTHER PEOPLE’S SPACES

As well as making sure that your online spaces say good things about you, keep in mind what kind of impression you’re making in the spaces you don’t control – other people’s social network profiles, for example, or public online spaces like games and online communities. Being a good “guest” and being a positive member of an online community can be a huge part of building your online brand. The Golden Rule – treat other people the way you’d like to be treated – is a good start, but you can also look for ways to be helpful and contribute to the online communities that you’re a part of.

DON’T MIX UP REPUTATION WITH CELEBRITY

None of this means that you need to spend all your time thinking about every word and picture that you post, wondering how people will see you. It doesn’t matter how many people are paying attention to you online: what matters is that the things you do online build a consistent image of you that reflects how you want to be seen.

5. How do you begin to commit to making fairminded digital footprints?

The hallmark of the strong-sense critical thinker is the embodiment of and deep commitment to intellectual virtues, or the development of intellectual character.

Yet, the extent to which anyone lives in accordance with these virtues on a daily basis is a matter of degree. No one can achieve the status of ideal thinker, exhibiting these characteristics at all times.

This is why the most advanced thinkers see themselves as “aspiring critical thinkers” rather than fully “critical thinkers.”

There is an intimate, dynamic interrelation between thinking, feeling, and wanting. Each is continually influencing the other two.

Powerful emotions or desires influence our thinking, help or hinder how well we think in a situation. At any given moment, our minds (that complex of inner thoughts, feelings and desires) can be under the sway of our native irrationality or our potential reasonability. When we are ruled by our irrational tendencies, we see the world from a narrow self-serving perspective. We are not truly concerned with how our behavior affects others. We are fundamentally concerned with getting what we want and/or with validating our beliefs and views.

The key to understanding human thought then, is, to understand its essential duality: its capacity for irrationality (being trapped in egocentric and/or sociocentric thought with its attendant self-deception, self-delusion, rationalization, and so forth)) and its capacity for reasonability (freeing itself from self-delusion, myth, and illusion). Though thinking, feeling and wanting are, in principle, equally important, it is only through thinking that we take command of our minds. It is through thinking that we figure out what is going wrong with our thinking. It is through thinking that we figure out how to deal with destructive emotions. It is through thinking that we change unproductive desires to productive ones. It is fairminded reasonability that frees us from intellectual slavery and conformity.

If we understand our mind and its functions, if we face the barriers to our development caused by egocentric and sociocentric thought, if we work upon our mind in a daily regimen, we can take the steps that lead to our empowerment as thinkers.

6. What is the key to understanding human thought?

The key to understanding human thought then, is, to understand its essential duality: its capacity for irrationality (being trapped in egocentric and/or sociocentric thought with its attendant self-deception, self-delusion, rationalization, and so forth)) and its capacity for reasonability (freeing itself from self-delusion, myth, and illusion).

Though thinking, feeling and wanting are, in principle, equally important, it is only through thinking that we take command of our minds. It is through thinking that we figure out what is going wrong with our thinking. It is through thinking that we figure out how to deal with destructive emotions. It is through thinking that we change unproductive desires to productive ones.

It is fairminded reasonability that frees us from intellectual slavery and conformity. If we understand our mind and its functions, if we face the barriers to our development caused by egocentric and sociocentric thought, if we work upon our mind in a daily regimen, we can take the steps that lead to our empowerment as thinkers.

7. What are the three distinct functions of the mind?
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8. How do thoughts, feelings and desires create your behavior?
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9. Do you have control of your thinking?
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10. What are your irrational beliefs?

Egocentric thinking comes from the unfortunate fact that humans do not naturally consider the rights and needs of others, nor do we naturally appreciate the point of view of others or the limitations in our own point of view.

We become explicitly aware of our egocentric thinking only if trained to do so. We do not naturally recognize our egocentric assumptions, the egocentric ways in which we use information, the egocentric ways in which we interpret data, the source of our egocentric concepts and ideas, the implications of our egocentric thought. We do not naturally recognize when we are operating from a self-serving perspective.

As humans we live with the unrealistic but confident sense that we have fundamentally figured out the way things actually are, and that we have done this objectively. We naturally believe in our intuitive perceptions—however inaccurate. Instead of using intellectual standards in thinking, we often use self-centered psychological standards to determine what to believe and what to reject.

Here are the most commonly used psychological standards in human thinking:

  • “IT’S TRUE BECAUSE I BELIEVE IT.” Innate egocentrism: I assume that what I believe is true even though I have never questioned the basis for many of my beliefs.
  • “IT’S TRUE BECAUSE I WANT TO BELIEVE IT.” Innate wish fulfillment: I believe in, for example, accounts of behavior that put me (or the groups to which I belong) in a positive rather than a negative light even though I have not seriously considered the evidence for the more negative account. I believe what “feels good,” what supports my other beliefs, what does not require me to change my thinking in any significant way, what does not require me to admit I have been wrong.
  • “IT’S TRUE BECAUSE I HAVE ALWAYS BELIEVED IT.” Innate self-validation: I have a strong desire to maintain beliefs that I have long held, even though I have not seriously considered the extent to which those beliefs are justified, given the evidence.
  • “IT’S TRUE BECAUSE IT IS IN MY SELFISH INTEREST TO BELIEVE IT.” Innate selfishness: I hold fast to beliefs that justify my getting more power, money, or personal advantage even though these beliefs are not grounded in sound reasoning or evidence.
11. How can you say what you mean and mean what you say?
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Break and Slow Walk
Practice in order

Take a break for 12 hours (min)
To help your awareness flow, go outside for a slow walk.


NEXT
II. Do Set
Practice in order

All Do Set activities are completed on your personal course blog.
To find your course blog click on the Learner Blogs link on the menu bar at the top of this page.