Week 4- What are the Elements of Reasoning and what is a community?

The purpose of this practiceis to create your definition of the Elements of Reasoning and community to begin to build a Community of Inquiry


Guiding Principle

If you practice using the Elements of Reason to check your thinking, you will improve at building community. 

Mindset

Learners who check their thinking, using the Elements of Reason, improve at building community.  .

Goal

Create “your own”clear and accurate definitions of the Elements of reason and community to begin to understand how to build community.


Practice Order

I. Absorb Set

Course Website
Read/view weekly course content

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

II. Do Set

Learner Blogs
Complete course activities on your personal course blog.


Due by Saturday 11:59 pm

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

III. Connect Set

Google Classroom

  • Complete providing feedback
Due by Monday 11:59 pm

Take a 12 hour break (min.)

IV. Reflect Set

Google Classroom

Grades- Complete self- assessment

Due by Tuesday 11:59 pm

Our goal is to develop into an active community of inquiry. A community of inquiry is a group of learners who practice and collaborate with each other in a purposeful critical way. Reflection is used to construct personal meaning. Everyone practices together to make sure there is a mutual understanding among the group.


To do this, there are essential dimensions of thinking that you need to master to learn how to deconstruct and upgrade your thinking.

In this course you will practice identifying the “parts” of your thinking and assess your use of these parts of thinking, as follows:

  1. All reasoning has a purpose.
  2. All reasoning is an attempt to figure, something out, to settle some question, to solve some problem.
  3. All reasoning is based on assumptions.
  4. All reasoning is done from some point of view.
  5. All reasoning is based on data, information, and evidence.
  6. All reasoning is expressed through, and shaped by, concepts and ideas.
  7. All reasoning contains inferences by which we draw conclusions and give meaning to data.
  8. All reasoning leads somewhere, has implications and consequences.


What are the Elements of Reasoning and what is a community


The meaning of sadhana.

Sadhana does not mean any specific kind of activity. Sadhana means you are using everything as a tool to open to the flow of natural experience.

Natural experience opens your connection to understanding and wisdom as it naturally comes and goes in the give and take of the river of life.

Sadhguru & T.Y. Pang

The meaning of true education.

True education should wake up the Innate Humanity inside of you. When you reach a higher level of practice and understanding, you learn to harmonize yourself inside, then you become able to harmonize with other people, and with outside situations.

T.Y. Pang

The Promise

It is up to you to make the time for practice; the more you practice the more you will learn.

Time is a created thing. To say I don’t have time,’ is like saying, I don’t want to.

― Lao Tzu

I. Absorb Set
Practice in order

Let’s Begin

First, please complete the sadhana practice. Second, click on each question and review each answer. Third, take a break!


1. Complete your sadhana practice.

Sadhana does not mean any specific kind of activity, sadhana means you are using everything as a tool to open to the flow of natural learning.

The purpose of this sadhana is to help you get started opening to the flow of natural experience .

Center yourself.

Click Here
This weeks centering thought

Close your eyes and quietly sit straight and upright head and spine straight, concentrating only on your breath for 2 minutes. Sit in an erect position, shoulders relaxed, palms flat on thighs. Center your focus on your midsection. Breath in and out deeply through your nose.

Relax & sit straight.

Quietly sit straight and upright head and spine straight, concentrating only on your breath. Sit in an erect position, shoulders relaxed, palms flat on thighs. Center your focus on your midsection. Breath in and out deeply through your nose.

Pay attention to your spine.

Your spine is where you will feel the flow of energy. Notice which parts of the spine feel warm and where there are no feelings or numbness. This information will indicate where your energy is flowing and where it is not. Your energy originates in the spine and flows out through the body.

straight and upright
When thoughts come up, let them go gently.

Don’t beat yourself up. That brings more thought. Gently let them go. Use the RAIN tool below to help you gently let go.


  • Recognize your thoughts.
  • Allow your thoughts to be just as they are.
  • Investigate your thoughts with kindness.
  • Natural awareness will come from not identifying with your thoughts.

Throughout the week, keep reminding yourself why you do sadhana.

Otherwise, your thoughts, your emotions, your physicality will get entangled with your runaway mind.

Practice tapping into your awareness to open your mind and take your thinking apart.
2 Why is it important to analyze my thinking?
3. How do I use thinking to make sense of the world?
4. How do I identify and question my thinking?
5. How do I figure something out?
6. What are the basic “parts” of thinking (reasoning)?
Critical Thinking and the Basic Elements of Thought
7. How do use the parts of thinking to check my thinking?
8. What is a community?

True, Genuine Community is the art and practice of being our most loving, open, and authentic selves while we honor others doing the same. This creates an environment that specifically caters to fulfillment of the six primary human needs and is foundational to the emotional aspect of sustainability for the complete human experience. Dr. M. Scott Peck did extensive research on the differences between traditional community and this idea of “True Community” in his book titled, “The Different Drum: Community Making and Peace.” This book is required reading for all One Community Pioneers and we support the foundational tenants of True Community outlined within it. Here they are in Peck’s own words:

  1. Inclusivity, commitment and consensus: Members accept and embrace each other, celebrating their individuality and transcending their differences. They commit themselves to the effort and the people involved. They make decisions and reconcile their differences through consensus.
  2. Realism: Members bring together multiple perspectives to better understand the whole context of the situation. Decisions are more well-rounded and humble, rather than one-sided and arrogant.
  3. Contemplation: Members examine themselves. They are individually and collectively self-aware of the world outside themselves, the world inside themselves, and the relationship between the two.
  4. A safe place: Members allow others to share their vulnerability, heal themselves, and express who they truly are.
  5. A laboratory for personal disarmament: Members experientially discover the rules for peacemaking and embrace its virtues. They feel and express compassion and respect for each other as fellow human beings.
  6. A group that can fight gracefully: Members resolve conflicts with wisdom and grace. They listen and understand, respect each others’ gifts, accept each others’ limitations, celebrate their differences, bind each others’ wounds, and commit to a struggle together rather than against each other.
  7. A group of all leaders: Members harness the “flow of leadership” to make decisions and set a course of action. It is the spirit of Community itself that leads and not any single individual.
  8. A spirit: The true spirit of Community is the spirit of peace, love, wisdom, and power. Members may view the source of this spirit as an outgrowth of the collective self or as the manifestation of a Higher Will.
9. How do I build community?

If you think about the tribes you belong to, most of them are side effects of experiences you had doing something slightly unrelated. We have friends from that summer we worked together on the fishing boat, or a network of people from college or sunday school. There’s also that circle of people we connected with on a killer project at work a few years go.

These tribes of people are arguably a more valuable creation than the fish that were caught or the physics that were learned, right?

And yet, most of the time we don’t see the obvious opportunity–if you intentionally create the connections, you’ll get more of them, and better ones too. If the hallway conversations at a convention are worth more than the sessions, why not have more and better hallways?

What would happen if trade shows devoted half a day to ‘projects’? Put multi-disciplinary teams of ten people together and give them three hours to create something of value. The esprit de corps created by a bunch of strangers under time pressure in a public competition would last for decades. The community is worth more than the project.

The challenge is to look at the rituals and events in your organization (freshman orientation or weekly status meetings or online forums) and figure out how amplify the real reason they exist even if it means abandoning some of the time-honored tasks you’ve embraced. Going around in a circle saying everyone’s name doesn’t build a tribe. But neither does sitting through a boring powerpoint. Working side by side doing something that matters under adverse conditions… that’s what we need.


We can choose to “give back,” or we can choose to give.

Viewing the web as a platform for generosity is very different than seeing an opportunity to turn it into an ATM machine. The way we spend our time online determines not only whether or not the community we choose grows and thrives, but it decides whether or not we will be part of what is built.

“What can I contribute today,” might be the very best way to become part of a community. Relentless generosity brings us closer together.

The alternative? The masses of web surfers spending their time wasting their time, taking, clicking, scamming or being scammed.

When you think of the real communities you belong to, your family, your best friends, the tribes that matter… of course the decision is easy. We don’t try to earn a little extra money when we split the bill at dinner or calculate market rate interest on a loan to a dear friend. And yet, when we get online, it’s easy to start rationalizing our way to short-term behavior and selfishness. Take or give?

“A tribe is a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader, and connected to an idea. For millions of years, human beings have been part of one tribe or another. A group needs only two things to be a tribe: a shared interest and a way to communicate.” 

By, Seth Godin


Break and Slow Walk
Practice in order

Take a break for 12 hours (min)
To help your awareness flow, go outside for a slow walk.


NEXT
II. Do Set
Practice in order

All Do Set activities are completed on your personal course blog.
To find your course blog click on the Learner Blogs link on the menu bar at the top of this page.